Aloe Body Toning Kit – Full details:

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Introducing Aloe Body Toning Kit – a collection of products that allows you to enjoy body wrap at the comfort of your home! Body wrap is designed to help trim, tone and tighten, while reducing the appearance of cellulite. Included in these products are European herbal complexes and natural warming agents, They are your “secret weapons” in the war against the unsightly and undesirable appearance of cellulite.

The Aloe Body Toning Kit consists of:

Aloe Bath Gelée: Thoroughly cleans the skin. This refreshing emulsion can be used either while taking a bath or while taking a shower. It prefers your skin for a treatment with the Aloe Body Toner.

Aloe Body Toner: Firms and improves the skin’s condition. This moisturizing cream is rich of spices. It effectively warms the skin and helps fight cellulite.

Aloe Body Conditioning Creme: smoothes and softens the skin. The cream has the ability to stimulate the blood circulation. Consolidated waste products, fat and liquids in the connective tissue can thus be drifted.

Loofah: stimulates the blood circulation of the skin and helps remove dead skin cells.

Plastic wrap: covers the skin and keeps it warm so to allow the skin tissue fully absorb the components of the toner.

Treat your body to what it deserves, and look your very best with this superior collection – Forever’s Aloe Body Toning Kit.


DIRECTIONS

Note: Best way to Cleanse yourself before WRAP is to with ALOE ACTIVATOR: Image

STEP 1 – Cleanse with Aloe Bath Gelée and loofah

Enjoy the luxurious experience with Aloe Bath Gelée. Cleanse, exfoliate, massage, enrich, revitalize, and relax with our exclusive Aloe Bath Gelée and loofah. Apply Aloe Bath Gelée to loofah and work into a rich lather by massaging the skin in a gentle motion. For best result, use daily to give your skin a soft touch and a smooth glow.

STEP 2 – Mark and Measure

It is recommended that you keep a record of your measurements to track inch loss. Before the toning process, lay a tape measure flat against your skin and mark your skin above and below the measuring tape using a permanent felt-tip pen. The marks serve as a guide to help you measure accurately. After the toning process is complete, placing the tape measure between the marks and measure again.

STEP 3 – Apply Aloe Body Toner

Prior to application of the Aloe Body Toner, test a small patch of skin for allergic reactions. If after 24 hours no itching or redness occurs, then smooth over the areas you wish to tone. The Aloe Body Toner contains warming agents that help stimulate effect on the skin. You may apply more toner to increase these effects.

STEP 4 – Apply Plastic Wrap

Wrap the plastic wrap around the areas where Toner has been applied. Do not wrap the following areas: FACE, NECK, CHEST, SHOULDERS, FOREARMS, CALVES or GENITAL AREAS. For your safety, the Aloe Body Toning Kit should be used only on the upper arms, abdomen and thighs. You may apply a second layer of plastic wrap if desired.

Leave the wrap in place for approximately one hour while in a relaxed position. Do not engage in any strenuous physical activity and do not fall asleep. Use blunt-tip scissors to remove the used plastic wrap. Placing the tape measure between the marks and measure again. Subtract the total from the original measurements – the difference represents your overall inch loss. Massage in any remaining Aloe Body Toner left on the skin.

Maintenance – Aloe Body Conditioning Creme

Use between body wraps – Aloe Body Conditioning Creme is the ideal complement to Aloe Body Toner for keeping your body feeling smooth and supple. It can be used as a maintenance cream when no wrapping is involved. When used between body wraps, apply Aloe Body Conditioning Creme to the entire body to achieve smooth and glowing skin. These complementary elements of the Body Toning Kit, together with dieting and regular exercise, can help reduce the appearance of cellulite.

Use during body wrap – During the toning process, apply cream directly to the skin on areas not wrapped. The Aloe Body Conditioning Creme is effective in stimulating circulation, breaking up trapped fluids and fatty tissues. Do not apply cream to irritated or newly shaved skin. Do not use immediately after bathing. Do not apply to the face, breasts, genital areas or mucous membranes. Avoid contact with the eyes. Rinse liberally with warm water in case of skin irritation or reaction.

Wash your hands immediately after use. Close lid tightly and keep out of the reach of children.

General Notes: Follow the wrapping procedure according to your desire to tighten up or slim down. On skin with long-term fat storage, the effect will be less visible due to the fact that fatty deposits turn hard once stored under the skin for a while. For maximum effect and a long-term benefit, proper diet and regular exercise will be required. Body wrapping may also bring less benefit to those with firm muscle tone.

People who benefit the most from body wrapping are likely those who have gained weight over a short period of time or who have loose muscle tone. You may apply the wrapping procedure safely two or three times in the first week, following with decreasing frequency in subsequent weeks.

It is normal to feel thirsty after the toning process, as water has been lost within the body. It is recommended that you drink more water to enhance metabolism and accelerate the elimination of water and fat.


WARNING – Do not use Toning Kit if you are pregnant, have had recent surgery, or if you have certain medical conditions including heart disease, phlebitis or circulatory problems. Test a small patch of skin to check for allergic reaction before use.

CONSULT YOUR DOCTOR PRIOR TO USING PLASTIC WRAP. KEEP PLASTIC WRAP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN.

IMPORTANTWhen using Toner and Conditioning Creme:

  • Wash your hands immediately after use.
  • Avoid contact with eyes.
  • Do not use on face, breasts or genital areas.
  • If skin irritation or reaction occurs, rinse with water immediately.
  • Do not use on irritated or newly shaved skin.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.
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Forever Living Products for Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Urinary InfectionsUrinary tract infection (UTI) facts

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infections of the urethra, bladder, ureters, or the kidneys, which comprise the urinary tract.
E. coli bacteria cause the majority of UTIs, but many other bacteria, fungi, and parasites may also cause UTIs.
Females have a higher risk for UTIs than most males, probably because of their anatomy; other risk factors for UTIs include any condition that may impede urine flow (e.g., enlarged prostate, congenital urinary tract abnormalities, and inflammation). Patients with catheters or those who undergo urinary surgery and men with enlarged prostates are at higher risk for UTIs.
Symptoms and signs of UTI vary somewhat depending on sex, age, and the area of the urinary tract that is infected; some unique symptoms develop depending on the infecting agent.
UTIs are diagnosed usually by isolating and identifying the urinary pathogen from the patient; there are some home tests available for presumptive diagnosis.
There are home remedies for UTI, but most may, at best, help reduce the risk or discomfort of UTIs. They are not considered cures for the disease.
There can be many complications of urinary tract infections, including dehydration, sepsis, kidney failure, and death.
If treated early and adequately, the prognosis is good for most patients with a UTI.
Although there is no vaccine available for UTIs, there are many ways a person may reduce the chance of getting a UTI.

What is a urinary tract infection (UTI)?
The urinary tract is comprised of the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra (see Figure 1). A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection caused by pathogenic organisms (for example, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in any of the structures that comprise the urinary tract. However, this is the broad definition of urinary tract infections; many authors prefer to use more specific terms that localize the urinary tract infection to the major structural segment involved such as urethritis (urethral infection), cystitis (bladder infection), ureter infection, and pyelonephritis (kidney infection). Other structures that eventually connect to or share close anatomic proximity to the urinary tract (for example, prostate, epididymis, and vagina) are sometimes included in the discussion of UTIs because they may either cause or be caused by UTIs. Technically, they are not UTIs and will be only be briefly mentioned in this article.
UTIs are common, leading to between seven and 10 million doctor visits per year. Although some infections go unnoticed, UTIs can cause problems that range from dysuria (pain and/or burning when urinating) to organ damage and even death. The kidneys are the active organs that produce about 1.5 quarts of urine per day. They help keep electrolytes and fluids (for example, potassium, sodium and water) in balance, assist in the removal of waste products (urea), and produce a hormone that aids in the formation of red blood cells. If kidneys are injured or destroyed by infection, these vital functions can be damaged or lost.
While most investigators state that UTIs are not transmitted from person to person, other investigators dispute this and say UTIs may be contagious and recommend that sex partners avoid relations until the UTI has cleared. There is general agreement that sexual intercourse can cause a UTI. This is mostly thought to be a mechanical process whereby bacteria are introduced into the urinary tracts during the sexual act. There is no dispute about the transmission of UTIs caused by sexually transmitted disease (STD) organisms; these infections (for example, gonorrhea and chlamydia) are easily transmitted between sex partners and are very contagious. Some of the symptoms of UTIs and sexually transmitted diseases can be similar (pain and foul smell).

urinary——- Picture of the urinary tract structures

What causes a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

The most common causes of UTI infections (about 80%) are E. coli bacterial strains that usually inhabit the colon. However, many other bacteria can occasionally cause an infection (for example, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Proteus, Staphylococcus, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, Serratia and Neisseria spp.), but are far less frequent causes than E. coli. In addition, fungi (Candida and Cryptococcus spp.) and some parasites (Trichomonas and Schistosoma) also may cause UTIs; Schistosoma causes other problems, with bladder infections as only a part of its complicated infectious process. In the U.S., most infections are due to Gram-negative bacteria with E. coli causing the majority of infections.

Causes-of-Frequent-Urination

What are urinary tract infection (UTI) risk factors?

There are many risk factors for UTIs. In general, any interruption or impedance of the usual flow of urine (about 50 cc per hour in normal adults) is a risk factor for a UTI. For example, kidney stones, urethral strictures, an enlarged prostate, or any anatomical abnormalities in the urinary tract increases infection risk. This is due in part to the flushing or washout effect of flowing urine; in effect, the pathogens have to “go against flow” because the majority of pathogens enter through the urethra and have to go retrograde (against a barrier of urine flow in the urinary tract) to reach the bladder, ureters, and eventually the kidneys. Many investigators suggest that women are far more susceptible than men to UTIs because their urethra is short and its exit (or entry for pathogens) is close to the anus and vagina, which can be sources of pathogens.
People who require catheters have an increased risk (about 30% of patients with indwelling catheters get UTIs) as the catheter has none of the protective immune systems to eliminate bacteria and offers a direct connection to the bladder. Catheters that are designed to reduce the incidence of catheter-related infections are available (they incorporate antibacterial substances into the catheter that suppress bacterial growth), but are not used by many clinicians because of short-termed effectiveness, cost, and concern about antibiotic resistance development in bacteria.
There are reports that suggest that women who use a diaphragm or who have partners that use condoms with spermicidal foam are at increased risk for UTIs. In addition, females who become sexually active seem to have a higher risk of UTI. The term, “honeymoon cystitis,” is sometimes applied to a UTI acquired either during the first sexual encounter or a UTI after a short interval of frequent sexual activity.
Men over the age of 60 have a higher risk for UTIs because many men at or above that age develop enlarged prostates that may cause slow and incomplete bladder emptying. In addition, older males and female populations have seen recent rises in STDs; this increase is thought to be due to this group not using condoms as frequently as younger age groups.
Occasionally, people with bacteremia (bacteria in the bloodstream) have the infecting bacteria lodge in the kidney; this is termed hematogenous spread. Similarly, people with infected areas that are connected to the urinary tract (for example, prostate, epididymis, or fistulas) are more likely to get a UTI. Additionally, patients who undergo urologic surgery also have an increased risk of UTIs. Pregnancy does not apparently increase the risk of UTIs according to some clinicians; others think there is an increased risk between weeks six through 26 of the pregnancy. However, most agree that if UTIs occur in pregnancy, the risk of the UTI progressing in seriousness to pyelonephritis is increased, according to several investigators. In addition, their baby may be premature and have a low birth weight. Patients with chronic diseases such as diabetics or those who are immunosuppressed (HIV or cancer patients) also are at higher risk for UTIs.

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Common urinary tract infection (UTI) symptoms in women, men, and children*

Common urinary tract infection (UTI) symptoms in women include:

  • Urge to urinate frequently, often in small amounts
  • Burning with urination
  • Cloudy urine
  • Strong unpleasant smell of urine
  • Dark or bloody urine
  • Pelvic pain
  • Flank or back pain (kidney infection)
  • Fever, chills (usually with kidney infection)
  • Other possible symptoms include bloating, vaginal discharge

Common urinary tract infection (UTI) symptoms in men include:

  • Urge to urinate frequently, often in small amounts
  • Burning with urination
  • Cloudy urine
  • Strong unpleasant smell of urine
  • Dark or bloody urine
  • Rectal pain (kidney infection)
  • Flank or back pain (kidney infection)
  • Other symptoms may include penile, testicular and abdominal pain, and penile discharge

Common urinary tract infection (UTI) symptoms in children include:

  • Urge to urinate frequently, often in small amounts
  • Burning with urination
  • Cloudy urine
  • Strong unpleasant smell of urine (not as reliable in children)
  • Dark or bloody urine
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Other symptoms (especially in newborns and infants) may include hypothermia, diarrhea, jaundice, poor feeding and in some children, bedwetting

What are urinary tract infection (UTI) symptoms and signs in women, men, and children?

The UTI symptoms and signs may vary according to age, sex, and location of the infection in the tract. Some individuals will have no symptoms or mild symptoms and may clear the infection in about two to five days. Many people will not spontaneously clear the infection; one of the most frequent symptoms and signs experienced by most patients is a frequent urge to urinate, accompanied by pain or burning on urination. The urine often appears cloudy and occasionally dark, if blood is present. The urine may develop an unpleasant odor. Women often have lower abdominal discomfort or feel bloated and experience sensations like their bladder is full. Women may also complain of a vaginal discharge, especially if their urethra is infected, or if they have an STD. Although men may complain of dysuria, frequency, and urgency, other symptoms may include rectal, testicular, penile, or abdominal pain. Men with a urethral infection, especially if it is caused by an STD, may have a pus-like drip or discharge from their penis. Toddlers and children with UTIs often show blood in the urine, abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting along with pain and urgency with urination.
Symptoms and signs of a UTI in the very young and the elderly are not as diagnostically helpful as they are for other patients. Newborns and infants may develop fever or hypothermia, poor feeding, jaundice, vomiting, and diarrhea. Unfortunately, the elderly often have mild symptoms or no symptoms of a UTI until they become weak, lethargic, or confused.
Location of the infection in the urinary tract usually results in certain symptoms. Urethral infections usually have dysuria (pain or discomfort when urinating). STD infections may cause a pus-like fluid to drain or drip from the urethra. Cystitis (bladder infection) symptoms include suprapubic pain, usually without fever and flank pain. Ureter and kidney infections often have flank pain and fever as symptoms. These symptoms and signs are not highly specific, but they do help the physician determine where the UTI may be located.

Is there a link between urinary tract infection (UTI) and pregnancy?

Most clinicians think there are several reasons (links) that make a pregnant female more susceptible to UTIs than nonpregnant women. Investigators suggest that hormones cause the bladder and ureters to dilate; this slows urine flow and may decrease bladder emptying which, in turn, increases the likelihood that bacteria can survive and multiply. Also during pregnancy, the acidity of urine decreases and this favors bacterial growth. The enlarging uterus puts pressure on the bladder, so the urge to urinate is more frequent in pregnancy. But many times, pregnant women wait to urinate for various reasons and this further slows flow. In some women, the pressure from the uterus prevents complete bladder emptying, again favoring bacterial growth. In general, pregnancy predisposes women to more kidney infections than bladder infections.

How-Does-A-Woman-Get-A-Urinary-Tract-Infection

How is a urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosed?

The caregiver should obtain a detailed history from the patient, and if a UTI is suspected, a urine sample is usually obtained. The best sample is a midstream sample of urine placed in a sterile cup because it usually contains only the pathogenic organisms instead of the transient organisms that may be washed from adjacent surfaces when the urine stream begins. Male patients with foreskin should retract the foreskin before providing a midstream urine sample. In some patients who cannot provide a midstream sample, a sample can be obtained by a catheter. The urine sample is then sent for urinalysis. Patients with a “discharge,” or possibility of having an STD, usually will have the discharge tested for STD organisms (for example, Neisseria and Chlamydia). A positive urinalysis is usually detection of about two to five leukocytes (white blood cells), about 15 bacteria per high-power microscopic field, and a positive nitrite test and/or positive leukocyte esterase test. Some clinicians and labs consider a positive test at least two of the above findings; still others report a positive for bacteria as >1,000 bacteria cultured per milliliter of urine. At best, the initial urinalysis, depending on the various criteria used by clinicians and labs, provides a presumptive positive test for a UTI. Most clinicians believe this presumptive test is adequate enough to begin treatment. A definitive test is usually considered to be isolation and identification of the infecting pathogen at a level of about 100,000 bacteria per cc of urine with the genus of the pathogen (usually bacterial) identified and antibiotic sensitivity determined by lab studies. This test takes 24-48 hours to obtain the results and your health care professional will usually start treatment before this result is available. Sometimes blood in the urine is a sign of a UTI but it may also indicate other problems, such as a urinary calculus or “stone.”
In young children, infants, and some elderly patients, the best urine specimen is obtained by catheterization, as they are unable to deliver a “clean catch” urine sample as described above. Urine can also be collected from “bags” placed over the urethral outlet (genital area), but these bagged specimens are only used for presumptive urinalysis as they are unreliable for culture. Some investigators consider any bagged urine samples as unreliable. Urine samples not processed within an hour of collection should either be discarded or be refrigerated before an hour passes because bacterial growth in urine at room temperature can yield false-positive tests. Special culture media and other tests are done for the infrequent or rare pathogens (for example, fungi and parasites).
Other tests may be ordered to further define the extent of a UTI. They may include blood cultures, a complete blood count (CBC), intravenous pyelogram, a CT scan, or other specialized tests.

Here would like to share with you some natural food supplements which will help  to treat smoothly UTI problem at very low cost and benefit you with more other health needs. FOREVER LIVING PRODUCTS have the best products for UTI treatment as follows:
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Forever Aloe Berry Nectar™ contains all of the goodness found in our Forever Aloe Vera Gel™, plus the added benefits of cranberry and apple.

Besides their reputation as a cleanser for the urinary tract, cranberries provide a high content of vitamin C. They are also a natural source of healthful proanthocyanidins.

Apple juice contains many flavonoids as well as pectin.

You can drink Forever Aloe Berry Nectar™ with meals or alone. The delicious flavor is totally natural, prepared from a blend of fresh cranberries and sweet, mellow apples. Added fructose (a natural fruit sugar) sweetens it just enough to please both adults and children alike.

  • All the benefits of Forever Aloe Vera Gel™ with the sweet taste of cranberries
  • Contains healthful phytonutrients
  • Natural source of Vitamin C

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